MARTHE JOCELYN

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non-fiction
Eleven writers you've likely never heard of, but will never forget...
picture books
How do you decide which pile to put that zebra in? Is it striped? Is it an animal? Is it black and white?
co-created with Nell Jocelyn
middle grade
historical fiction
Orphan meets real world. Part of the SECRETS series.
craft books
Picture Books
Illustrated by Tom Slaughter
Originally written by Beth Gleick in 1960! Now re-printed with collage illustrations by Marthe Jocelyn
Who eats what?
Alphabet in English, French & Spanish
Look at Opposites "with pizzazz"
also available in Danish and Japanese!
Summer is the season that lingers and hurries by at the same time.
Wake up, Nellie! The fun is about to begin!
Governor General Award Finalist
Teen Novel
Short stories in Anthologies
Stories selected by Marthe Jocelyn
Board Books
What should you wear to feel best all year?
Toddler favourite now a board book!
Opposites on board...
Historical Fiction
"An irresistible blend of depth, wit and inventiveness."(Toronto Star)
A story for reluctant teen readers about the first New York City subway!
Most Distinguished Book of the Year! 2004
2002-2003 Finalist for Hackmatack and Red Cedar Awards
Short stories in Anthologies
Stories selected by Marthe Jocelyn
a story in On Her Way Stories & Poems About Growing Up Girl
Non-Fiction
A history of the Foundling Hospital in London, England Shortlisted for the Norma Fleck Award! (Best Non-fiction of the Year)
Chapter Books
The Invisible Day, The Invisible Harry, The Invisible Enemy 3 books about being invisible in Manhattan

The Broadway Tunnel

The first subway ever built in New York City was dug in SECRET!

... It was only seconds later that I spotted my father in a shadowed doorway a few paces away. He spoke intently with a man in a wide-brimmed hat. It was so wide, I couldn't see his eyes, only a chin covered in a busy beard. He was giving my father and envelope and nodding.
I was so eager about the job possibility that I didn't pause to think I might be interrupting.
"Hey, Dad!" I called, raising my had to clap him on the shoulder.
My father spun around at the sound of my voice and took a step back, knocking into the door frame behind him. Slightly off balance, he shoved the envelope into his uniform pocket without acknowledging the other gentleman when he moved swiftly away. Dad stared at me, looking shocked, like I was getting ready to thump him. It was then that he blushed, a deep ruddy flame that burned his whole face.

A pneumatic train built in secret!

The first station featured a grand piano, a fountain and a chandelier!