MARTHE JOCELYN

Quick Links

picture books
How do you decide which pile to put that zebra in? Is it striped? Is it an animal? Is it black and white?
co-created with Nell Jocelyn
middle grade
historical fiction
Orphan meets real world. Part of the SECRETS series.
craft books
Picture Books
Illustrated by Tom Slaughter
Originally written by Beth Gleick in 1960! Now re-printed with collage illustrations by Marthe Jocelyn
Who eats what?
Alphabet in English, French & Spanish
Look at Opposites "with pizzazz"
also available in Danish and Japanese!
Summer is the season that lingers and hurries by at the same time.
Wake up, Nellie! The fun is about to begin!
Governor General Award Finalist
Teen Novel
Short stories in Anthologies
Stories selected by Marthe Jocelyn
Board Books
What should you wear to feel best all year?
Toddler favourite now a board book!
Opposites on board...
Historical Fiction
"An irresistible blend of depth, wit and inventiveness."(Toronto Star)
A story for reluctant teen readers about the first New York City subway!
Most Distinguished Book of the Year! 2004
2002-2003 Finalist for Hackmatack and Red Cedar Awards
Short stories in Anthologies
Stories selected by Marthe Jocelyn
a story in On Her Way Stories & Poems About Growing Up Girl
Non-Fiction
A history of the Foundling Hospital in London, England Shortlisted for the Norma Fleck Award! (Best Non-fiction of the Year)
Chapter Books
The Invisible Day, The Invisible Harry, The Invisible Enemy 3 books about being invisible in Manhattan

The Invisible Day


from School Library Journal


Fifth-grader Billie Stoner longs for more freedom. Her days and nights are carefully monitored by her mother, and shared with her younger sister since New York City is a place of "countless dangers." While on a family excursion to Central Park, Billie discovers a mysterious cosmetics bag that she quietly secrets away. At school the next day, she samples one of the powders in it and becomes invisible. Her ability to move through her school and throughout the city unseen proves to be both humorous and challenging. Not only must she outsmart her teacher, but also her mother, who is the school librarian. With the help of her friend Hubert, Billie travels uptown to the home of an eccentric teenage scientist, Jody, the owner of the cosmetics bag and the only one who can help Billie regain visibility. The story has a predictable plot, but children will find it intriguing. The girl learns some lessons in her travels, and comes to appreciate and miss her family. Some characterization is rather shallow. Still, the story keeps a good, fresh pace, and the ending is neatly tied up with a bowthe class bully's attempts at plagiarism are thwarted, Billie becomes visible, and she finally gains some freedom from her mother. Her first-person narrative gives the book a chatty, comfortable tone. Children will readily identify with Billie's thoughts, motives, actions, and language.

In the Booklist interview, Anne Fine speaks about how children today can never get away from adults, "there's no longer that sense of safety and freedom." Here, first-novelist Jocelyn dramatizes that dependence in a funny story about a fifth-grader in Manhattan who can get no peace from her overprotective single mother ("Bathrooms were the only place where a kid can be alone"). When Billie finds a magic makeup kit that makes her invisible, she can, for the first time in her life, walk alone on the street and ride the subway all by herself. She feels like an alien. Kids will enjoy the fantasy as Billie evades her hovering mother, tricks her teachers and the classroom bully, and travels across town to a teenage inventor, who makes her visible again. Her adventure is also a celebration of New York City, with all the riches of its crowded streets. Readers will be touched by the ending, when Billie and her mother recognize what was sometimes "invisible": how much they love each other and how Billie must learn to be on her own, even in a dangerous world.
Come and try the magic... or is it science?

Also Available in German!

Und plötzlich war ich unsichtbar

von Marthe Jocelyn
Cecilie Dressler Verlag
126 Seiten mit vielen Illustrationen von Antje Dressler
16,80 DM
ab 9 Jahren

Nur ein kleines bisschen Puder hat sich Billie auf die Nase geschmiert und schon passiert es! Sie ist unsichtbar! Nur ihre Stimme ist noch zu hören. Zuerst findet Billie das prima. Sie schleicht sich unbemerkt aus der Schule und schlendert ganz allein durch New York. Dabei platzt sie aus Versehen mitten in die Dreharbeiten eines Kinofilms, und sie lernt eine verrückte Erfinderin kennen. Die soll Billie wieder entzaubern, aber so einfach geht das nicht. Da muss auch noch Hubert, der beste Kaugummi-Kauer der Welt, mithelfen..