MARTHE JOCELYN

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Board Books
follow that string!
Follow that button!
What are you wearing to feel best all year?
Toddler favourite now a board book!
Opposites on board...
picture books
co-created with Nell Jocelyn
co-created with Nell Jocelyn
Illustrated by Tom Slaughter
Originally written by Beth Gleick in 1960.
Who eats what?
Alphabet in English, French & Spanish
Look at Opposites "with pizzazz"
also available in Danish and Japanese!
Summer lingers and hurries by at the same time.
Wake up, Nellie! The fun is about to begin!
Governor General Award Finalist
Teen Novel
"Poignant and ... witty"
non-fiction
Eleven writers you've likely never heard of, but will never forget...
A history of the Foundling Hospital in London, England
middle grade
historical fiction
Orphan meets real world. Part of the SECRETS series.
"An irresistible blend of depth, wit and inventiveness."(Toronto Star)
A story for reluctant teen readers about the first New York City subway!
Most Distinguished Book of the Year! 2004
craft books
short stories in anthologies
Stories selected by Marthe Jocelyn
Stories selected by Marthe Jocelyn
Chapter Books
The Invisible Day, The Invisible Harry, The Invisible Enemy 3 books about being invisible in Manhattan

The Invisible Enemy

from School Library Journal


In this sequel to The Invisible Day and The Invisible Harry, sixth-grader Billie Stoner's enemy, Alyssa, steals her backpack on a class trip to the Cloisters in northern Manhattan, snoops through her stuff, and uses up an entire dose of Vanishing Powder. The invisible Alyssa, now more beastly than ever, forces Billie to help her return to normal, but not before they spend a torturous night at Billie's home, right under the nose of her librarian mom. The only person who can make the girl reappear is the brilliant high-school student who invented the potion and its antidote, which is made of something foul (including dog food and bubble-gum juice). This story focuses on the girls' relationship and gives possible cause as to what makes Alyssa so nasty. It is slow in parts, but fans of the previous books will enjoy the contemporary lingo and identify with the middle-schooler's angst over friends, family, and boys. Carter's amusing, full-page, black-and-white wash illustrations are scattered throughout.